Ninth Circuit Rules on Travel Ban/Refugee Order in Hawaii v. Trump

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled this week that President Trump went too far with his modified travel bans. Here is the opening summary of the Court’s decision:

State of Hawaii v. Donald Trump (excerpted)

We are asked to delineate the statutory and constitutional limits to the President’s power to control immigration in this appeal of the district court’s order preliminarily enjoining two sections of Executive Order 13780 (“EO2” or “the Order”), “Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States.” The Immigration and Nationality Act (“INA”) gives the President broad powers to control the entry of aliens, and to take actions to protect the American public. But immigration, even for the President, is not a one-person show. We conclude that the President, in issuing the Executive Order, exceeded the scope of the authority delegated to him by Congress. In suspending the entry of more than 180 million nationals from six countries, suspending the entry of all refugees, and reducing the cap on the admission of refugees from 110,000 to 50,000 for the 2017 fiscal year, the President did not meet the essential precondition to exercising his delegated authority: The President must make a sufficient finding that the entry of these classes of people would be “detrimental to the interests of the United States.” Further, the Order runs afoul of other provisions of the INA that prohibit nationality-based discrimination and require the President to follow a specific process when setting the annual cap on the admission of refugees. On these statutory bases, we affirm in large part the district court’s order preliminarily enjoining Sections 2 and 6 of the Executive Order.

The decision is an interesting read. The Court lays out the chronology of the President’s Executive Orders and the resulting suits by the States et al. The Court analyzes the alleged harms presented by Hawaii, with regard to standing: harm to proprietary interests and impairment of its sovereign interests. Ultimately, the Court cites the granddaddy of all cases on judicial review, Marbury v. Madison, and says it will not abdicate its obligation of judicial review.

From there, the discussion surrounds whether or not the President’s Order is clearly within the office’s congressionally delegated authority under 1182(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

The Court examines then whether national security concerns are applied too broadly by exluding persons according to their nationality. The Court concludes, “the Order does not offer a sufficient justification to suspend entry of more than 180 million people on the basis of nationality.” (p.43). The Decision then looks at the Refugee program suspension, and finds the statute does not provide a mechanism for decreasing the statutorily mandated totals.

The Decision only upholds the District Court’s preliminary injunction, finding that lower Court did not abuse its discretion.

The back of the decision reads like screen credits from a movie, with seven pages of attorneys listed as counsel to the case. Many, many amicus briefs.

Of course, at some point, the Supreme Court will weigh in on the Executive Orders and travel bans. I can’t help but note several Constitutional Law 101 cases are cited in this decision. The Decision is grounded in the Immigration and Nationality Act and in an analysis of national security concerns.  The decision does not focus on intent to discriminate or President Trump’s campaign statements. The decision does find that there’s not sufficient legal justification to suspend the refugee program, and lower the number of refugee admissions.

I think the Ninth Circuit basically got it right. As this and other Circuit decisions come out, it becomes apparent that the Supreme Court can approach the issues in a number of ways.  They can look at the President’s bans in terms of Constitutional overreach, or as violating or not violating the First Amendment, or as actions within or not within the authorization of the Immigration and Nationality Act.  In the end, though, I think there needs to be some limit on how far the President can go when it comes to immigration.  In particular, I think the blanket travel bans and refugee suspensions went too far.

Tags: , , , ,

Comments are closed.