Posts Tagged ‘baseball’

Pittsburgh Pirates Jung Ho Kang’s Denied Visa for DUI Arrests

Friday, March 24th, 2017 by W. Scott Railton

The news is reporting that Jung Ho Kang, the Pittsburgh Pirate’s starting third baseman from South Korea, was denied a visa to play ball this year in the United States due to his past DUIs. The news reports that he has been sentenced to 8 months in jail, which has been suspended, for a December 2016 DUI arrest. Additionally, it is reported that he has two past DUI arrests. Mr. Kang is not a client of ours, and so all comments here are based the hearsay of reported news. His high profile case is illustrative for all persons facing DUI issues, and so I thought I’d type out a few comments.

A single Driving under the influence conviction is not typically a basis for inadmissibility. A single offense may create an admissibility issue if there are aggravating factors. However, the Immigration and Nationality Act renders inadmissible anyone who is deemed a “habitual drunkard”. The habitual drunkard standard does not mean anyone who has ever been arrested for DUI or who, say, is a member of Alcoholics Anonymous. Inadmissibility is established on health-related grounds, and out of concern that a person may be a threat to the “property, safety, or welfare of the alien or others.”

Here’s how it plays out.  A person goes into a visa interview at a foreign consulate, and on the forms acknowledges the past arrests and/or convictions. The Consular Officer then evaluates the whole of the visa application, and probably would refer the person to a Panel Physician, to evaluate whether there is a “habitual drunkard” or other threatening health condition. Panel Physicians are government approved physicians, who are trained to conduct medical examinations related to admissibility issues. They make determinations based on Technical Instructions issued by the Center for Disease Control.

The Department of State has been cracking down in the last year or so on DUI issues. They have implemented a policy of “prudentially revoking” visas for persons who have been arrested for DUIs, and have required that such persons re-apply for visas before seeking to re-enter the U.S.

Nonimmigrant waivers may be available, as need be. A person in Mr. Kang’s situation would first need to obtain a recommendation for a nonimmigrant waiver, if required. This recommendation is forwarded to U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s Admissibility Review Office for further review. CBP will apply a balancing test weighing the need for entry, rehabilitation, and the threat of harm to the U.S. Waivers are easier to obtain after the passage of time from the underlying event(s).

Department of State’s 9 FAM 403.11-5(B) (U) on Prudential Revocations

c. (U) Prudential Revocation for Driving Under the Influence: Either Post or the Department has the authority to prudentially revoke a visa on the basis of a potential INA 212(a)(1)(A) ineligibility when a Watchlist Promote Hit appears for an arrest or conviction of driving under the influence, driving while intoxicated, or similar arrests/convictions (DUI) that occurred within the previous five years. This does not apply when the arrest has already been addressed within the context of a visa application; i.e., the individual has been through the panel physician’s assessment due to the arrest. This does not apply to other alcohol related arrests such as public intoxication that do not involve the operation of a vehicle. Unlike other prudential revocations, consular officers do not need to refer the case to the Department, but can prudentially revoke on their own authority. Post should process the revocation from the Spoil tab NIV and add P1A3 and VRVK lookouts from the Refusal window.

Immigration and Nationality Act excerpt:

Sec. 212. [8 U.S.C. 1182]
(a) Classes of Aliens Ineligible for Visas or Admission.-Except as otherwise provided in this Act, aliens who are inadmissible under the following paragraphs are ineligible to receive visas and ineligible to be admitted to the United States:
(1) Health-related grounds.-
(A) In general.-Any alien-
(i) who is determined (in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services) to have a communicable disease of public health significance; 1b
(ii) 1except as provided in subparagraph (C) 1a who seeks admission as an immigrant, or who seeks adjustment of status to the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence, and who has failed to present documentation of having received vaccination against vaccine-preventable diseases, which shall include at least the following diseases: mumps, measles, rubella, polio, tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, pertussis, influenza type B and hepatitis B, and any other vaccinations against vaccine-preventable diseases recommended by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices,
(iii) who is determined (in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in consultation with the Attorney General)-
(I) to have a physical or mental disorder and behavior associated with the disorder that may pose, or has posed, a threat to the property, safety, or welfare of the alien or others, or
(II) to have had a physical or mental disorder and a history of behavior associated with the disorder, which behavior has posed a threat to the property, safety, or welfare of the alien or others and which behavior is likely to recur or to lead to other harmful behavior, or
(iv) who is determined (in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services) to be a drug abuser or addict, is inadmissible.
(B) Waiver authorized.-For provision authorizing waiver of certain clauses of subparagraph (A), see subsection (g).

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Posted in Scott Railton |

P-1’s and Pennants

Tuesday, October 25th, 2016 by Abtin Bahador

As Major League Baseball’s (“MLB”) World Series gets under way, let us take a moment to remember a simpler time before the season started, when the hopes of all 30 MLB teams and fans were at their highest. While fans in the U.S. were dreaming of the season ahead, many foreign-born players were getting ready for the season by working out to lose off-season weight, packing their bags, and standing in lines at consulates around the world to apply for visas.

As the American pastime increasingly becomes the Central American pastime, more and more of our favorite major league players are born outside the U.S. The Cleveland Indians and Chicago Cubs both field several foreign-born players from the Dominican Republic, Venezuela and even Brazil.

All foreign workers, including baseball players, require approvals from the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State before they can play ball in the U.S.

Many foreign-born players come to the U.S. and apply their skills in P-1 status. The P-1A classification is designed for Internationally Recognized Athletes to come to the United States temporarily to perform as an athlete, individually or as part of a team, at an internationally recognized level of performance.

As with most employment-based classifications, the P-1 is employer specific. The individual MLB teams apply to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) during the offseason. The teams need to time the filing of the application to ensure it is approved with enough time to allow for the player to attend a visa interview at a U.S. Consulate or Embassy in their home country before the season starts.

While the actual visa interview itself is typically short, the administrative processing surrounding the issuance of the physical visa can delay things significantly, especially if there are criminal or medical issues that require further information. This can mean weeks of waiting for players to join their teammates.

While you may not own a baseball team, your business can acquire its own foreign-born “heavy-hitter” by applying for one of several non-immigrant employment visa categories. The process to sponsor a foreign employee is similar to the P-1 process described above. Select the applicable category, apply to USCIS for approval, and depending on the employee’s country of origin apply to the Department of State for a Visa.

For further information regarding non-immigrant employment options, please visit, http://www.cascadia.com/resources/temporary-immigration/.

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Posted in Abtin Bahador |