Posts Tagged ‘Bellingham’

Time To Determine H-1B Worker Needs

Friday, January 25th, 2019 by W. Scott Railton

Employers get a single bite at the apple each year to use the H-1B program.  On April 1st, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will begin accepting applications for H-1B workers. The window for filing is only five business days.

After the window closes, the agency will hold its annual lottery of applications.  Twenty thousand slots are available for graduates with Master’s degrees or higher, from U.S. institutions. Another sixty-five thousand slots are reserved for persons with at least undergraduate degrees or the equivalent (e.g. equivalency through work experience).  Those selected will not be able to start any sooner than October 1st, 2019.  In practice, the agency has sometimes taken longer to adjudicate cases.

Last year, the agency also projected a 25% denial rate, based on increasingly stringent adjudication standards. Certain professions, particularly in the information technology sector, need to really focus on delivering evidence that the position indeed qualifies as a “specialty occupation.”

H-1B employers are required by law to pay at least the greater of the prevailing wage or actual wage for the position. These figures can be calculated a number of ways,  including through Department of Labor resources, collective bargaining agreements, or private wage studies.

H-1Bs are typically granted for three years, and renewable another three years.  In some cases, it is possible to renew them beyond six years, such as when someone has proceeded sufficiently  down the green card path.

Sometimes it makes sense for NAFTA TN workers to be switched to H-1B status, if possible. The Immigration and Nationality Act specifically permits H-1B holders to pursue permanent residence.  This is not the case with the TN status.

Some employers are not subject to the annual H-1B cap, and can petition for H-1B status any time during the year.  These include institutions of higher education, affiliated organizations, and non-profit research organizations. Determining whether an organization is cap-exempt can be a complicated affair in some cases, but this exemption is very valuable. We see many medical organizations that are cap exempt, based on their connection to institutions of higher education.

The H-1B application takes some lead time to prepare, due to the complexity, and particularly due to prerequisite Labor Condition Application that must be filed with the Department of Labor. The LCA usually takes at least a week to process. A pre-registration rule cleared the Office of Management and Budget on January 25th, and could end up adding an additional process, though a court challenge is also possible.

This post only touches the highlights of the process. The key point is April 1st is approaching quickly, and if there appears to be a need to file an H-1B, now is the time to take further steps to investigate and perhaps prepare the application.

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Posted in General, Scott Railton |

H-1B Annual Quota Fills in Week 1

Friday, April 5th, 2013 by W. Scott Railton

Unsurprisingly, the H-1 annual cap filled today. H-1Bs are a nonimmigrant category visa type, reserved for specialty occupation workers with at least a Bachelor’s Degree or the equivalent, coming to work for a U.S. employer in position requiring such an educational background. In recent years, the annual quota has taken months to fill. The expectation this year was that the quota would fill fast, but nobody knew for sure how fast.  Now we do.  For those who were able to get their petitions filed by April 5th, congratulations! Now….there will be a lottery.

For those who did not meet the annual quota, there are a few considerations.  First, know that not all employers are subject to the H-1B cap.  There are cap-exempt employers, such as non-profit research organizations, institutions of higher education, and organizations affiliated with institutions of higher education.  Second, if a beneficiary was previously counted under another cap in the past six years, they are still eligible for an H-1B with a new employer.  Third, this year the possibility of immigration reform is higher than ever. Congress may end up allocating more numbers.  We’ll stay on top of these points, and in fact, I will be traveling to Washington D.C. soon to discuss this employer concern, amongst others, with legislators.

Today’s announcement from USCIS:

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced today that it has received a sufficient number of H-1B petitions to reach the statutory cap for fiscal year (FY) 2014. USCIS has also received more than 20,000 H-1B petitions filed on behalf of persons exempt from the cap under the advanced degree exemption. After today, USCIS will not accept H-1B petitions subject to the FY 2014 cap or the advanced degree exemption.

USCIS will use a computer-generated random selection process (commonly known as the “lottery”) for all FY 2014 cap-subject petitions received through April 5, 2013. The agency will conduct the selection process for advanced degree exemption petitions first. All advanced degree petitions not selected will be part of the random selection process for the 65,000 limit. Due to the high number of petitions received, USCIS is not yet able to announce the exact day of the random selection process. Also, USCIS is currently not providing the total number of petitions received, as we continue to accept filings today. USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions that are otherwise exempt from the cap.

USCIS will provide more detailed information about the H-1B cap next week.

For more information about USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

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Posted in General |