Posts Tagged ‘Expedited removal’

U.S.-Canada Preclearance Agreement In Effect

Friday, August 16th, 2019 by W. Scott Railton

The Department of Homeland Security announced this week that a preclearance agreement is now in effect with Canada. This basically means that major Canadian airports will be on equal footing with land port of entries, legally speaking.

Expedited removal is now a tool airport CBP inspectors can use to find Canadians inadmissible and banned for five years, in cases of fraud and unlawful immigrant intent. Previously, this type of removal –basically a legal fiction with real impacts for someone not in the U.S.—only occured to someone presenting themselves for admission at a land port of entry, or when illegally seeking entry outside a port.

There is very limited recourse for an expedited removal order. In clear cases of error, sometimes they can be overturned. There is also a waiver process, but this usually works best after some time has passed. The criticism of expedited removal is it leaves no real route for appeal: CBP can be judge, jury, and executioner, so to speak, when they apply this measure. Sometimes agents have been known to be a bit too zealous in lowering this boom.

When I testified in the Canadian Senate in 2018 on marijuana legalization, some Senators had new reservations about their passage of the preclearance bill. There have been situations, particularly where someone has already been denied entry once, where I’ve felt better having them seek entry anew at an airport than at a land port of entry, just so expedited removal is not a consideration.

The preclearance rule will also possibly lead to joint operations at smaller ports of entry, such as can be found in rural border crossings. This can save money and lead to efficiencies, though one has to wonder about the sharing of information.

Here is the full announcement:

United States and Canada Implement Preclearance Agreement
Release Date:
August 15, 2019

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced today, in partnership with the Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, the implementation of an agreement to improve mutual security and expedite lawful travel through preclearance for travelers and their accompanying baggage on certain transports. The collaboration is articulated in the Agreement on Land, Rail, Marine, and Air (LRMA) Transport Preclearance between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Canada, which supersedes the previous 2001 U.S.-Canada Agreement on Air Transport Preclearance, and expands upon the two countries’ partnership.

Preclearance is the process by which officers stationed abroad inspect and make admissibility decisions about travelers and their accompanying baggage before they leave a foreign port, simultaneously increasing efficiency and security. The LRMA provides the legal framework and reciprocal authorities necessary for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Canada Border Services Agency to carry out security, facilitation, and inspection processes in the other country.

“Preclearance strengthens economic competitiveness and mutual security, and benefits travelers by expediting their clearance into the U.S. before they ever leave Canada,” said Acting Secretary Kevin K. McAleenan. “This agreement provides the opportunity for CBP to build on six decades of successful operations and, for the first time, to conduct full preclearance in the rail, ferry, and cruise ship environments. This achievement is important for the Department’s security objectives and is another example of just how close the U.S. – Canada relationship stands.”

CBP currently conducts preclearance operations at eight Canadian airports: Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, and Winnipeg. CBP officers also conduct immigration pre-inspection at multiple locations in British Columbia in the rail and marine modes; these locations will have the opportunity to convert to full preclearance, per the terms of the Agreement.

“The new Canada–U.S. Preclearance Agreement is now in force, creating new opportunities in all modes of transportation in both Canada and the United States,” said the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. “Expanding preclearance makes travel faster and bolsters trade, while better protecting our rights.”

As the Agreement is fully reciprocal, in addition to the potential expansion of CBP preclearance operations in Canada, the Agreement permits Canada to pursue preclearance operations in the United States. This agreement also enables exploration of co-location at small and remote ports of entry and includes additional tools and authorities to help enforce immigration, customs, and agriculture laws, facilitate lawful travel, and ensure officer protection and accountability.

The LRMA was signed by the U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security and Canadian Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness on March 16, 2015, fulfilling a commitment of the Beyond the Border Action Plan (Beyond the Border Action Plan). The U.S. Congress passed the necessary supporting legislation in December 2016 and Canada’s Parliament did so in December 2017. Canada published their required implementing regulations in June 2019, paving the way for entry into force following an exchange of Diplomatic Notes today.

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Posted in General, Marijuana and Immigration, Scott Railton |

Expanded Use of Expedited Removal

Tuesday, July 30th, 2019 by W. Scott Railton

Last week the Administration announced it is expanding the use of expedited removal. Expedited removal is a form of deportation which does not require an administrative hearing or other judicial review. Authorized by section 235 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, expedited removal allows CBP and ICE agents to deport persons who enter or seek to enter the United States without proper documents or by fraud. The “expedited” part of the removal basically means that low-level officers in the government can make a decision on removal, without review by a judge.

Expedited removal has been available in certain cases since 1997. This most recent expansion of policy applies to noncitizens, anywhere in the United States, if they cannot prove continuous physical presence for the past two years. Previously, the time frame was 14 days and the geographic area was limited to within 100 miles of the Canadian and Mexican borders. Unaccompanied minors are not impacted by the new rule, and persons can still claim relief if they can articulate a credible fear of return to their home country.

Most of the news about this policy has focused on undocumented who are inside the United States. Many are advising that undocumented persons gather up evidence to prove they’ve been in the United States for more than two years, in case they encounter an ICE agent. Such preparations may be sufficient to satisfy an officer, on the spot, that expedited removal is not available.

Most of our expedited removal cases arise at the U.S.-Canada border, where there are misrepresentations while seeking entry. We expect to see expedited removal to be used more frequently locally, in light of the Administration’s announcement. The typical case is one where someone says they are seeking entry for one purpose, when in fact they are seeking entry for another purpose, or several unrelated purposes.

The application of a fraud finding can be complicated sometimes, because there are sins of commission and omission. I expect the border will be taking a more expansive view of what constitutes fraud, in the exercise of its expedited removal powers. The trouble with this is there is no administrative or judicial review of such a decision.

If a person is placed in expedited removal, they are barred from seeking re-entry for at least five years, unless they obtain the consent of the U.S. government to seek entry again. There are nonimmigrant waivers available, but the likelihood of success of an application will depend on the merits of the application. There are substantial fees and a processing times to consider as well.

Sometimes it is possible to challenge the actual expedited removal order, through communications with agency leadership. Make no mistake—that is usually a tough road—but I supervisors will reconsider a matter, if a decision is clearly erroneous.

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Posted in General, Marijuana and Immigration, Scott Railton |

Increase in Expedited Removals at the Northern Border

Friday, December 8th, 2017 by W. Scott Railton

We are seeing an increase in expedited removals at the border in recent months. This is to be expected, based on the Trump Administration’s Executive Orders on immigration and the subsequent memos issued by the Department of Homeland Security on implementing these orders.

Expedited removal is authorized under section 235 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. If an officer determines a person has made a material misrepresentation, claimed citizenship falsely, or doesn’t have the appropriate documentation to enter the U.S., an expedited removal may be effectuated. Typically, we’re seeing a five year ban applied

Expedited removal usually occurs after a lengthy interview with multiple officers in secondary inspection. We’ve heard of persons interviewed on and off for four to eight hours, though eight would be unusual.

Electronic searches of phones and computers are increasingly a part of the inspection. Officers will ask questions and look for contradictions. Often, we see statements where people admit to misrepresentations, offered originally in hopes of more easily gaining entry.

Sometimes expedited removals are issued because the agency finds the applicant for admission to be an immigrant without an immigrant visa. This type of determination often happens when they learn someone has been working without authorization in the United States, or the person is seeking admission so that they can live with their spouse, perhaps with the expressed intent of “squaring away” their immigration papers later.

Expedited removal orders are tough to overturn.

The statute expressly makes the determinations beyond judicial review—that means you cannot go to court and get a judge to change the decision. Sometimes, if the order in manifestly incorrect or unfair, it is possible to take the issue up with a supervisor after the fact. Otherwise, the best available path is waivers.

The waiver process varies based on several factors, and can be complicated, lengthy, and expensive. In a nutshell, the availability of waivers depends on if permanent residence is sought, or something less permanent. Procedurally, there are differences in process for Canadians and non-Canadians. Anyone with an expedited removal order should not approach the border without legal advice and obtaining consent to reapply for admission first, as there is risk of criminal penalty.

Recovering from an expedited removal order can take time. Each case is different. We are of course available to advise on expedited removals and similar border issues, and have been doing so for many years.

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Posted in General, Scott Railton |