Posts Tagged ‘ICE’

I-9 Workshop on August 20th

Wednesday, July 31st, 2019 by W. Scott Railton

The attorneys at Cascadia, in coordination with the Bellingham Chamber of Commerce, will be presenting an I-9 Workshop on August 20th. The workshop is free for anyone to attend. It will take place at the Bellingham Regional Chamber of Commerce, at 119 N. Commercial St., Ste 110, Bellingham. The workshop will be from 8:00 to 9:30 AM.  Here is a link to the Chamber’s announcement.

The purpose of the workshop is to assist businesses and their HR teams with worksite compliance for immigration issues, with a focus on I-9 completion and management, social security no-match letters, and ICE enforcement actions.

In the past year, we’ve seen an uptick in the number of businesses that receive Notices of Inspections for their I-9s. ICE can demand to see a company to produce all their I-9 records within 3 business days, which can surprise businesses sometimes. As it is said, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

We expect that attendees will be able to walk away from the workshop better prepared to address workplace compliance issues at their businesses.

We are also available to discuss worksite compliance concerns with businesses, by appointment.

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Posted in General, Scott Railton |

Expanded Use of Expedited Removal

Tuesday, July 30th, 2019 by W. Scott Railton

Last week the Administration announced it is expanding the use of expedited removal. Expedited removal is a form of deportation which does not require an administrative hearing or other judicial review. Authorized by section 235 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, expedited removal allows CBP and ICE agents to deport persons who enter or seek to enter the United States without proper documents or by fraud. The “expedited” part of the removal basically means that low-level officers in the government can make a decision on removal, without review by a judge.

Expedited removal has been available in certain cases since 1997. This most recent expansion of policy applies to noncitizens, anywhere in the United States, if they cannot prove continuous physical presence for the past two years. Previously, the time frame was 14 days and the geographic area was limited to within 100 miles of the Canadian and Mexican borders. Unaccompanied minors are not impacted by the new rule, and persons can still claim relief if they can articulate a credible fear of return to their home country.

Most of the news about this policy has focused on undocumented who are inside the United States. Many are advising that undocumented persons gather up evidence to prove they’ve been in the United States for more than two years, in case they encounter an ICE agent. Such preparations may be sufficient to satisfy an officer, on the spot, that expedited removal is not available.

Most of our expedited removal cases arise at the U.S.-Canada border, where there are misrepresentations while seeking entry. We expect to see expedited removal to be used more frequently locally, in light of the Administration’s announcement. The typical case is one where someone says they are seeking entry for one purpose, when in fact they are seeking entry for another purpose, or several unrelated purposes.

The application of a fraud finding can be complicated sometimes, because there are sins of commission and omission. I expect the border will be taking a more expansive view of what constitutes fraud, in the exercise of its expedited removal powers. The trouble with this is there is no administrative or judicial review of such a decision.

If a person is placed in expedited removal, they are barred from seeking re-entry for at least five years, unless they obtain the consent of the U.S. government to seek entry again. There are nonimmigrant waivers available, but the likelihood of success of an application will depend on the merits of the application. There are substantial fees and a processing times to consider as well.

Sometimes it is possible to challenge the actual expedited removal order, through communications with agency leadership. Make no mistake—that is usually a tough road—but I supervisors will reconsider a matter, if a decision is clearly erroneous.

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Posted in General, Marijuana and Immigration, Scott Railton |

Washington State Department of Licesning On Use of Facial Recognition Technology

Tuesday, July 9th, 2019 by W. Scott Railton

The Washington Post and New York Times recently ran stories concerning the use of facial technology to identify persons via the state driver’s license databases.  Washington State’s Department of Licensing has issued a press release, basically suggesting this is, dare I say, fake news. Here is what the Department of Licensing says:

DOL statement regarding facial recognition technology
July 8, 2019

July 8, 2019 For Immediate Release.

News Reports – ICE and the FBI using facial recognition technology to scan state driver’s license databases.

Statement from Department of Licensing Director Teresa Berntsen:

“National news reports about federal law enforcement and immigration officials’ use of state facial recognition databases has led to a high level of misunderstanding and confusion about how our state Department of Licensing protects this data. Our DOL has implemented strict standards to ensure data is not released to any law enforcement entity for immigration purposes or without a judicial court order or subpoena. There is no external access to the Facial Recognition System. System access is limited to very few specially trained DOL staff. We take very seriously our responsibility to protect the data and information of all Washingtonians.”

Background

The Washington Post reported ICE and the FBI using facial recognition technology to scan state driver’s license databases, including photos of legal residents and citizens. The Department of Licensing does not provide access to our Facial Recognition System to local, state, or federal law enforcement entities. They must provide the agency with a court order signed by a judge.

The New York Times states “agents authorized administrative subpoenas of the Department of Licensing to conduct a facial recognition scan of all photos of license applicants, though it was unclear whether the state carried out the searches.” The agency received 53 requests through court order or subpoena since 2013. Thirteen of those were federal requests. None have been received from 2017 to present. The remaining 40 were from local and state law enforcement entities.

Federal requests include:

One – U.S. Department of Justice
Two – Federal Bureau of Investigation
Four – Department of Homeland Security/Immigrations and Customs Enforcement
Six – U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration

If a match was found through any request during this time, DOL would provide limited identity information.

DOL’s Use of Facial Recognition Technology

KUOW ran the headline “ICE uses Washington driver’s licenses to hunt immigrants for deportation, researchers say.” This is incorrect. No entity has access to DOL’s facial recognition system. They would provide a photo and DOL would conduct the research.
Law enforcement entities have no access to “mine” DOL’s state driver’s license databases using facial recognition technology.
As of January 2018, all requests must be court ordered.

DOL’s Facial Recognition Process

After receiving a court-ordered subpoena, DOL performs a search by comparing the photo provided by a law enforcement entity with DOL’s database. If a match occurs between the photo provided by the entity with a photo in DOL’s database, DOL provides the individual’s first, middle, and last name, date of birth, and ID or driver license number.
The Department of Licensing does the research. There is no direct external access to the facial recognition system. System access is limited to very few specially trained DOL staff.

Immigration and Citizenship Status

The Department of Licensing does not collect information regarding a person’s immigration or citizenship status.
The Department of Licensing does not collect place of birth.
The Department of Licensing does not provide Social Security numbers.

Governor’s Executive Orders

The Department of Licensing is committed to following the Governor’s Executive Order 17-01 Reaffirming Washington’s commitment to Tolerance, Diversity and inclusiveness.
We fully comply with Executive Order 16-01, Privacy Protection and Transparency in State Government. We only collect information that is necessary to perform our agency duties to establish identification and driving privileges.

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Posted in Scott Railton |