Posts Tagged ‘waiver’

CBP Pilot Program for Electronic Filing for Waivers for Canadians

Thursday, May 30th, 2019 by W. Scott Railton

U.S. Customs and Border Protection will institute a pilot program for electronic filing of I-192 Nonimmigrant Waiver and I-212 Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission applications. Currently, these applications are filed in person at the Port of Entries and Pre-Flight Inspections. This announcement impacts visa exempt countries, which means principally Canadian citizens.

My initial concern is whether the on-line filing system will adequately accept evidence in support of the application. I suppose that is the benefit of a pilot program; they can decide what works and doesn’t. There are many potential benefits, as outlined in the announcement. The agency is clearly trying to further limit how much it handles immigration benefits issues at ports of entries, which is concerning as an agency goal. The agency similarly extended its L-1 Pilot Program recently, despite heavy criticism from stakeholders.

Here is the agency announcement:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is pleased to announce the pilot of the Electronic Secured Adjudication Forms Environment (e-SAFE) mid-year 2019.  The new online system will allow for electronic filing of Form I-192, Application for Advance Permission to Enter as a Nonimmigrant, and Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal.  Citizens of specified visa exempt countries—Canada, Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia and the Marshall Islands—who are nonimmigrants and have been found inadmissible will be able to apply for a waiver online.  Applicants will be able to view their application status, submit additional information if requested, and ultimately learn the outcome of their online waiver application through this system.

e-SAFE will streamline and reduce the processing time, and provide instruction on how to fill out the applications.  Applicants who submit and pay for electronic filing via e-SAFE must go to the following ports of entry to complete the biometrics portion (fingerprints and photograph) of the application:

 • Peace Bridge, New York • Lewiston Bridge, New York • Rainbow Bridge, New York • Peace Arch, Washington • Pacific Highway, Washington • Point Roberts, Washington • Toronto Pearson International Airport
 
These are the only ports of entry able to process electronic filing of Forms I-192 and I-212. Other locations will be added gradually and will be published on the e-SAFE public web page and on www.cbp.gov/travel/international-visitors/e-safe and e-SAFE.cbp.gov.  CBP will continue to accept paper filing at ports of entry, but as e-SAFE is added to more ports of entry, paper filing locations will become limited.

Authorized attorneys or accredited representatives will be able to create special managed accounts to assist their clients in completing the application, upload the required documents and pay the client’s application fee once a validated Form G-28 is on file.  However, applicants are responsible for the accuracy of all information submitted on their behalf.

Please review the attached frequently asked questions or visit www.cbp.gov/travel/international-visitors/e-safe for the most current information. 
A separate email notice will be sent when e-SAFE is available for electronic filing.

Sincerely,

Keri Brady, Director U.S. Customs and Border Protection Admissibility Review Office

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Posted in General, Marijuana and Immigration, Scott Railton |

Canada’s Cannabis Act and U.S. Inadmissibility

Friday, September 21st, 2018 by W. Scott Railton

Canada’s Cannabis Act, otherwise called Bill C-45, legalizes cannabis nationally on October 17th. The starting point for all U.S. border issues is the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act. With that in mind, I’ve put together a list below of the key provisions of the INA concerning marijuana and inadmissibility.

I. Criminality Related Grounds

A. Personal:

a.) A past conviction related to cannabis [INA § 212(a)(2)(A)(II)];
b.) Admitting to committing a violation of any law or regulation of a foreign country related to controlled substances [INA § 212(a)(2)(A)(II)];
c.) Admitting to committing acts which constitute the essential elements of any law or regulation of a foreign country related to controlled substances [INA § 212(a)(2)(A)(II)];

Note: Cannabis on person/in car: this is a Customs violation, likely warranting a fine and further questions. Not typically referred for prosecution, though a violation of the Controlled Substance Act. Waiver usually required thereafter. Also, note, cannabis may also be involved in crimes involving moral turpitude, a separate basis of inadmissibility.

B. Illicit Trafficking (“Reason to Believe”: no conviction required)

d.) Where the U.S. Government knows or has “reason to believe” (no conviction required) is an illicit trafficker, or who is or has been a knowing aider, abettor, assister, conspirator or colluder with others who are in illicit trafficking [INA § 212(a)(2)(C)(i)];

e.) A spouse, son or daughter of an illicit trafficker, who has received financial or other benefit from the illicit trafficking in the past five years, and knew or reasonably should have known that the financial or other benefit was a product of such illicit activity. [INA § 212(a)(2)(C)(ii)];

II. Health related grounds (“Drug abuser/Drug Addict”; “Physical/Mental Disorder”)

f.) A determination that a noncitizen is a drug abuser or drug addict, in accordance with regulations prescribed by Health and Human Services [INA § 212(a)(1)(A)(iv)];

g.) A determination that a noncitizen has a physical or mental disorder and behavior/ history of behavior posing threat to property, safety or welfare of others [INA § 212(a)(1)(A)(iii)(I and II)]

• Panel physician – have to pay government certified physician for exam
• CDC Technical Instructions requires 1 year of remission

III. National Security- (Unlawful purpose)

h.) Seeking entry principally or incidentally for an unlawful activity [INA § 212(a)(3)(ii)];

IV. Misrepresentation/Fraud

i.) Fraud or willfully misrepresenting a material fact in pursuit of an immigration benefit [INA § 212(a)(6)(C)].

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Posted in General, Scott Railton |

J-1 Conrad Waiver Slots for Physicians Opens On October 1st

Wednesday, September 19th, 2018 by W. Scott Railton

On October 1st, Health Departments around the country will begin accepting J-1 waiver applications under the Conrad program. Each state is allotted 30 spots, with the majority going to primary care physicians, who agree to work for three years in a health professional shortage area. In turn, their two year foreign residency requirement is waived. We routinely prepare these applications.

Rules vary state to state, although the federal government has minimum requirements. Washington State, where we are located, historically takes between six and twelve months to fill all of its spots. However, last year Oregon, which also used to be slow to fill, filled their spots in record time. Some states receive more than 30 applications on the first day the window opens.

Here are a few of the key rules for Washington State:

  • Up to ten sponsorships are available for Specialists between October 1st to March 31st. Last year, more than 10 applications were submitted during this period, but spots were still left available after March 31st. This has historically been true too.
  • Washington State also allows 10 non-designated FLEX waivers per year, with these slots opening on January 15th.
  • Washington State limits employers to only three waivers, prior to June 1st of the fiscal year.
  • Applicants, including integrated health care systems in a single HPSA, are limited to a.) two sponsorships per practice location; b.) one hospitalist sponsorship per hospital; c.) no more than three sponsorships total across all practice locations in the HPSA between October 1st and May 31st; d.) and no more than three FLEX spots by a an applicant for a single county.
  • Sponsors must show at least 15% of total patient visits are for Medicaid or other low income patients. This is up from the former 10% figure.
  • The process also requires that sponsors show at least six months of qualifying recruitment in the past 12 months in Washington State.

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Posted in General, Scott Railton |